Compilation of National Geographic’s Best Pictures of 2017


National Geographic has compiled a list of its best images of 2017. National Geographic’s 57 best images of the year—curated from 88 photographers, 112 stories, and nearly 2 million photographs.

We are showing 18 if these pictures along with their details. To view the complete list, visit their Official Website

All images courtesy of [National Geographic]

In a shelter in Vrindavan, known as a “city of widows,” Lalita (at right) bears the cropped hair and white wrap her culture once considered obligatory for widowhood. Shelter manager Ranjana, a much younger widow, is less constrained by traditional customs.

This photo was originally published in “For Widows, Life After Loss,” in February 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY AMY TOENSING, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Wearing a curtain and a cardboard crown, Kristina Khudi becomes the “tundra princess” in the Nenets camp near the Kara Sea. The eight-year-old says her happiest time is summer, when a helicopter sent by Gazprom and the regional government brings her and other kids home from school to their migrating families.

This photo was originally published in, “They Migrate 800 Miles a Year. Now It’s Getting Tougher.,” in October 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY EVGENIA ARBUGAEVA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A 10-month-old jaguar cub is caught in the infrared beam of a camera trap as it returns to the safety of a tree in Brazil’s Pantanal region, the world’s largest tropical wetland and one of the last bastions for jaguars. Mothers coax cubs into climbing trees early on so they can learn to avoid predators.

This photo was originally published in “Inside the Hidden World of Jaguars,” in December 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY STEVE WINTER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

 

 

A California sea lion hunts for fish on a kelp paddy at Cortes Bank, a seamount off San Diego. It’s a trove of marine life that deserves protection, conservationists say.

This photo was originally published in “Why It’s Important to Save Our Seas’ Pristine Places,” in February 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY BRIAN SKERRY, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A curious young Weddell seal, weeks old, comes in for a close-up. It may have been the pups’ first swim, says marine biologist Pierre Chevaldonné, who has worked at Dumont d’Urville. Weddell seals are the most southerly breeding mammal in the world.

This photo was originally published in “Deepest Dive Ever Under Antarctica Reveals a Shockingly Vibrant World,” in July 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY LAURENT BALLESTA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

In 2011, the Zetas cartel, seeking revenge against members believed to be informants, rampaged through Allende and neighboring towns, killing dozens, and possibly hundreds. For this stricken community, the Day of the Dead holiday, when Mexicans honor their ancestors, has taken on extra poignancy.

This photo was originally published in “How the U.S. Triggered a Massacre in Mexico,” in July 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KIRSTEN LUCE, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

The DMZ Peace Train carries South Korean soldiers and tourists from Seoul to train terminals closest to the DMZ. Each cabin has a different theme—peace, love, and harmony—which were designed to inspire feelings of hope and reconciliation.

This photo was originally published in “Korea’s Heavily Armed Border Is Packed With Tourists,” in November 2017.

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID GUTTENFELDER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

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Compilation of National Geographic’s Best Pictures of 2017

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